Could Stem Cell Therapy Be the Future of Medicine in Malaysia?

WORDS LIM TECK CHOON

Stem cells are a unique type of cell in our body. This is because they are the only type of cells that can develop, under the right triggers and condition, into a variety of more specialized cells, such as blood cells, muscle cells, bone cells, and more.

HOW STEM CELLS ARE USEFUL 
  • Researchers can generate a variety of human cells from stem cells in the laboratory. These cells are then used to test new medications for possible side effects.
  • Research is also conducted on generating healthy cells that can replace those in our body that are dying or damaged due to age or disease. Such use of stem cells is called regenerative medicine.
THE 2 TYPES OF HUMAN STEM CELLS
  • Hematopoietic stem cells (usually abbreviated as HSCs), which are found in cord blood, bone marrow, and peripheral blood
  • Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which as found in the gel-like substance (Wharton’s jelly) of the umbilical cord, bone marrow, fat tissue, and tooth pulp
REGENERATIVE MEDICINE IS THE FUTURE?

Judging from the versatility of stem cells when used to produce of a variety of healthy human cells, regenerative medicine has obvious benefits for people whose tissues are damaged or dying due to diseases as well as people in need of tissue transplant.

Just some of the cells that can be generated from stem cells in the laboratory. Click the image above for a larger version.
Promising for treating heart diseases

Dr Lee Tjen Jhung, a cardiologist affiliated with the National Heart Institute (IJN), says, “While heart diseases are usually treated with medication, angioplasty and by-pass surgery, cell-based regenerative therapy is gaining popularity in the cardiovascular field due to the ability of mesenchymal stem cells to provide new blood in areas affected by restricted blood flow as well as promote the formation of new blood vessels.”

An answer to ageing-related health issues?

Dato’ Dr Rajbans Singh, the President of the Malaysian Wellness Society, points out that stem cells can play a crucial role in treating aging-related health problems.

He elaborates: “At birth, the human body has approximately 80 million active stem cells However, by age 40, less than 25 million active stem cells are functional. Ageing leads to a massive loss of stem cells in the body, affecting the ability of organs and tissues to repair and regenerate as the body gradually ages and deteriorates.”

Here’s a general, simplified overview of how the whole procedure works
  1. Stem cells are grown in a laboratory, and then manipulated to grow and specialize into a more specific type of cells (heart muscle cells, blood cells, etc)
  2. These cells are then implanted into the person that can benefit from this procedure, for example a person with heart disease could be implanted with heart muscle cells, injected into their heart
  3. These transplanted cells will then play a role in repairing and/or replacing the affected damaged tissue or organ of that person.

In reality, the procedure is not so straight forward, as there are many potential complications to take into account.

Nonetheless, the promise of regenerative medicine is too good to resist, hence researchers are continuously looking into creating and fine-tuning various procedures that can hopefully one day reduce or even replace our reliance on medications!

THE STEM CELL CONTROVERSY

There is considerable ethical debate on the use of stem cells that are sourced from fertilized egg cells or embryos that are donated for research.

These days, many centres that offer stem cell therapy claim to source their stem cells ethically—from the umbilical cords of young and healthy women after they have delivered their babies.

In Malaysia, the sourcing and processing of stem cells are governed by the Current Good Manufacturing Practices or cGMP, issued by the National Pharmaceutical Regulatory Agency (NPRA). You can view it here (link opens in a new tab).

Read This Before You Reach for Your Snacks This FIFA World Cup Season

WORDS LIM CHAIN YIN

LIM CHAIN YIN
SEA Nutrition Lead
Mondelēz International
TIP 1
Portion Out Your Snack
  1. Be sure to pace yourself throughout the equal halves.
  2. Once you’ve decided what you want to eat, portion it out. This can help you slow down, so that you enjoy your snack.
  3. Check in with yourself to see if you’re full and satisfied before having another portion.
  4. To keep tabs on how much you eat, always check the serving size per package on the label and put your snack in a bowl or on a plate.
TIP 2
Alter Your Choices

If you’re watching the game late at night, you might have a craving for something to eat. Remember that your body works harder when it’s sleeping, so try to snack on something light that will give you energy to keep going, but won’t make it hard for your body to digest.

TIP 3
Enjoy Every Bite

Snacking while engaging in other activities—in this case, watching the game—can easily lead to unconsciously eating more than you should.

  1. Take a moment during the interval to savour your snack with all of your senses. To fully enjoy your snacking experience, pay attention to the smell, taste, texture, shape, and colour of your food.
  2. Take small bites and chew slowly and be sure to finish one bite before starting the next.
TIP 4
Put Your Snacks Out of Reach

When watching a game in your living room, make sure your snacks are beyond arm’s reach. That way, you will be less likely to keep going back for more and inadvertently grab more than you need.

TIP 5
Drink Water, Lots of It!

Your brain tends to trick you into wanting to snack more, but you might just be thirsty. So, drink a glass of water and wait for a couple of minutes before deciding whether or not you’re hungry.


Snacking mindfully is a simple way to tune into your body’s needs. It can be practised by anyone, anywhere, and at any age. It is a great habit in cultivating a positive relationship with food by making deliberate and conscious choices to promote your well-being as well as keeping a balanced lifestyle. But habits take time to build and change, so taking small steps is a good way to start out!

Diets & Exercise Tips to Regain Your Pre-Pregnancy Body Shape

WORDS DR VICKY KOH

DR VICKY KOH
Medical Director
Clinic RX
WELL, READ THIS FIRST

Every woman’s body is unique. Therefore, the question of the ‘right option’ or ‘best option’ is something that each and every woman has to figure out on her own.

For example, mothers that breastfeed often experience rapid weight loss and may benefit from an increased intake of certain nutrients or supplements. Women that gave birth via caesarean section may need a longer time to recover. Existing health issues and lifestyle variables also need to be considered.

If you are interested to find out more about the topics discussed below, you should discuss the matter further with your doctor.

BREASTFEEDING CONSIDERATIONS

Postpartum weight loss averages about 4.5 to 5.5 kg in the first 6 weeks. Women often return to their pre-pregnancy weight within a year, though this time frame varies depending on how much weight was gained during their pregnancy.

Breastfeeding aids in weight loss since it consumes extra calories, resulting in a natural weight loss for many women.

Breastfeeding women should pay special attention to their diets at this time.

While experiencing weight loss after giving birth may seem like a good idea, doing so too quickly will actually hinder healing!

POST-PREGNANCY DIETARY RECOMMENDATIONS

Dietary recommendations should include a variety of fresh produce, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats.

Breastfeeding mothers, in particular, should drink a lot of water (6-10 glasses daily). Try to stay away from sodas and other sugary drinks.

Meanwhile, for moms that had a C-section, they should focus on eating foods that are high in protein. Avoid junk foods and take vitamin supplements, especially if they are nursing.

Vitamin and mineral supplements are crucial for moms during and after pregnancy.

This is because nutrients such as calcium, iron, vitamin D, folic acid, zinc, and more are normally redirected from the mother’s bloodstream to the developing infant.

Furthermore, the delivery process as well as breastfeeding depletes the body of essential vitamins.

Hence, postnatal supplements such as calcium, vitamin D, B vitamins, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), magnesium, selenium, iodine, and choline may be helpful in replenishing nutrients that were used up during pregnancy and after childbirth.

EXERCISE RECOMMENDATIONS

Regular exercise after childbirth will help strengthen and tone your muscles while increasing your energy levels and making you feel less weary.

It also aids in the loss of excess weight.

During the first 6 weeks, the uterus returns to its pre-pregnancy size, and some women may feel uterine cramping and discharge.

However, mothers are recommended to gradually resume their exercise habits, starting with less strenuous activities during the first few weeks after giving birth.

A few days after delivery, you can start doing gentle abdominal and pelvic floor exercises if they don’t cause you any pain.

Try to proceed at your own pace—you can gradually increase the duration and tempo of your workout of over time.

Swimming, cycling, yoga, pilates, mild weight training, and low-impact aerobics are all good alternatives after the first few weeks.

Important Advice to Stay Prepared During the Monsoon Season

WORDS LIM EN NI

LIM EN NI
Chief Pharmacist
Alpro Pharmacy

The Malaysian Meteorological Department (MetMalaysia) recently announced that Malaysia will experience continuous heavy rainfall from mid-November, leading to probable major flash floods in several states, and the monsoon season will last until early next year.

We would like to outline several precautionary measures for residents in flood-prone areas, from a community pharmacist’s point of view, to proactively mitigate flood damages ahead of the period and in the aftermath.

BEFORE A FLOOD
  • Closely monitor your surroundings and stay up to date on weather forecasts and warnings
  • Assemble disaster supplies, including long-term medications and first aid kits in water-proof bags in case of evacuation.
  • People, especially the elderly, with chronic diseases, are advised to visit their nearest pharmacy and bring along with their chronic medications, in order to keep a record in the pharmacy and have an up-to-date medication list; this will be useful should one lose the hard-copy of their prescription and face difficulties in retrieving their medication
AFTER A FLOOD
  • Due to poor sanitation and hygiene in flood areas, there is a high risk of flood-borne diseases such as leptospirosis, cholera, and dengue fever. Keep an eye out for general symptoms such as fever, headache, diarrhoea, muscle aches, and vomiting. In the case of any such symptoms, please visit the nearest healthcare centres immediately.
  • Alpro Pharmacy and DOC2US have launched the Life-saving Medication Care Programme, which provides a one-time supply of medications for up to 7 days for free. Those with contaminated or lost chronic disease medications can visit an Alpro Pharmacy outlet and speak to the pharmacist for more details. Note that a police report copy of the flooding is required for verification purposes.

Stay dry, stay safe!

How Breast Ultrasound & Mammogram May Save Your Life

WORDS LIM TECK CHOON

DR WINNIE NG NYEK PING
Consultant Clinical Oncologist
Subang Jaya Medical Centre
NO FAMILY HISTORY OF BREAST CANCER = NO PROBLEM? WELL, THINK AGAIN!

“Even if one has no known family history of cancer, external factors such as environmental exposures, prolonged exposure to female hormones and lifestyle features may contribute to an increased relative risk of breast cancer,” says Dr Winnie Ng, a consultant clinical oncologist.

“Aside from genetics, there are numerous underlying possible causes of breast cancer,” says Dr Ng
  • Alcohol intake
  • Smoking
  • Prolonged exposure to female reproductive hormones such as oestrogen, such as in women that reach menstruation at early age, women that have never been pregnant, women on oral contraceptive pills, women that experience menopause late, and woman that have their first full-term pregnancy at a later age
  • Postmenopausal women on hormone replacement therapy
  • Obesity

Theerfore, even if you have no family history of breast cancer, Dr Ng recommends that still going for breast cancer screening.

“The easiest method of screening is by self-examination of the breast,” she adds.

How to perform a breast self-examination. Click on this image to view a larger version.
AS WE STILL DON’T HAVE A CURE FOR BREAST CANCER, SCREENING REMAINS THE MOST PRACTICAL SOLUTION TO DETECT BREAST CANCER EARLY

Dr Ng recommends that

  • Women below 40 should undergo a breast ultrasound
  • Women above 40 are advised to go for a mammogram

You should consult your doctor about your risk factors and how often you should go for breast cancer screening.

 “A breast cancer diagnosis is not a death sentence. Self-tests and regular screenings can save lives,” says Dr Winnie Ng.

Keep the Hope of Pregnancy Alive in Spite of Breast Cancer

WORDS LIM TECK CHOON

DR CHRISTINA LAI NYE BING
Consultant Clinical Oncologist
Sunway Medical Centre
DR HOO MEI LIN
Consultant Gynaecologist and Fertility Specialist
Sunway Medical Centre
WHY IS BREAST CANCER SO PREVALENT AMONG YOUNGER WOMEN THESE DAYS?

Aside from unhealthy diet and exposure to cancer-causing chemicals or carcinogens in the environment, Dr Christina Lai Nye Bing shares that one possible factor is that women are choosing to marry and have children at a later age.

This somewhat paradoxical concept can be explained by the link between breast cancer and the female sex hormone oestrogen.

“Breast cancer is a hormone-related cancer, and high levels of oestrogen in the body increases the risk of breast cancer as it encourages cancer cells to grow by promoting cell division and reproduction,” Dr Christina explains. “Women in the previous generation who get married and have children earlier have a lower risk of breast cancer, as the oestrogen in their body decreases when they are pregnant and choose to breastfeed.”

IS PREGNANCY IMPOSSIBLE AFTER CHEMOTHERAPY?

Given that chemotherapy plays a big part in the treatment regime of many women with breast cancer, this raises the concern of whether the dream of having a family in the future an impossible one for them.

The unfortunate truth is that chemotherapy affects a woman’s fertility, with a 40% to 80% chance of early menopause.

The ovaries stop producing eggs upon menopause, so with that, the dream dies… or does it?

While Dr Hoo Mei Lin admits that the damage to the ovaries due to chemotherapy is irreversible, there is still a glimmer of hope.

“Patients can plan ahead, as conservation methods such as embryo freezing, egg freezing, and ovarian tissue freezing are available to enable patients to fulfil their wish of having children,” she shares.

Egg and ovarian freezing are suitable options for women that do not have a partner prior to having to undergo chemotherapy.

KEEP THE DREAM ALIVE

Dr Hoo advises breast cancer patients to have an open mind about their future and even consider having children.

After all, breast cancer patients under the age of 45 have an 80% survival rate after treatment!

“With the rapid advances in medical technology today, there is hope for breast cancer patients and survivors to plan their future. Technologies like egg and embryo freezing gives them the opportunity to have children in the future,” she says.

When it comes to cancer diagnosis, the focus is often about treating it, making fertility an afterthought. However, with the advancement in medical technology, surviving a cancer diagnosis is becoming increasingly successful hence, it is important to speak to your doctor as there are ways to help preserve fertility.

Invasive Mold Infections: A Rare but Deadly Fungal Disease

WORDS DR LOW LEE LEE

DR LOW LEE LEE
Infectious Disease Physician
Sultanah Bahiyah Hospital
FUNGI: OUR FRIENDS & FOES (IT’S COMPLICATED)

Fungi are found naturally in our environment. There are many different types of fungi, over 2 million species however about 600 fungi have caused diseases.

Invasive fungal infections typically manifest as a severe and aggressive form of the disease, leading to corresponding to high prevalence and death rates if left untreated.

These infections include invasive mold infections.

INVASIVE MOLD INFECTIONS AT A GLANCE
  • Usually caused by Aspergillus (giving rise to invasive aspergillosis) but can also be caused by other rarer molds such as Mucormycetes (giving rise to mucormycosis).
  • These molds produce spores; most of us encounter these spores every day without getting ill, but people with compromised immune systems may develop complications as a result of these spores.
  • Despite invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis being relatively uncommon, invasive mold infections are often life threatening. If left untreated, the mortality rates can reach 100%!
  • Various parts of the world reported superinfections of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis in patients with COVID-19, which are associated with increased risk of death. COVID-19 likely increases the risk for fungal infections because it weakens the immune system or due to certain therapies used for treatment such as steroids.
  • There are no specific symptoms, as symptoms can vary depending on the type of infection. This makes diagnosis an infection a challenging and sometimes complicated task!
Invasive Aspergillosis
Aspergillosis and how it affects our lungs. Click on the image for a larger, more detailed version.
  • Invasive aspergillosis is uncommon and occurs primarily in immunocompromised people.
  • Commonly seen in people that have undergone stem cell and other organ transplants (especially lung transplant), as well as in patients with blood-related cancers such as acute leukemia.
  • Typically affects the lungs, but it can also spread to other parts of the body.
Mucormycosis
  • Mucormycosis is rare and estimated to affect approximately 10,000 cases worldwide, barring India. If India is included the numbers rise to 910,000 cases annually!
  • Typically occurs in the sinuses of the nose or lungs; however it can spread to the brain and other organs as well.
COMMON SYMPTOMS OF A POSSIBLE INVASIVE MOLD INFECTION
  • Typical pneumonia symptoms including fever, chest pain, cough, coughing up blood, and shortness of breath
  • Sinus infection, which may be painful
  • Pain, tenderness, swelling and pressure around the eyes, cheeks, nose or forehead
  • One-sided facial swelling
  • Headaches
  • Nasal or sinus congestion
  • Black lesions on nasal bridge
HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK OF AN INVASIVE MOLD INFECTION
  • When performing activities that involve close contact with soil and dust, such as yard work or gardening, take care to wear shoes, long pants, and long-sleeved shirts
  • Whenever possible, avoid dusty areas like construction or excavation sites; wear a N95 mask when you have to visit these areas
  • Keep your house dry and mold-free
  • Avoid staying in a moldy home (even while it is being cleaned)

#YouMatter Promotes Mental Health Awareness and Creates Safe Space

WORDS LIM TECK CHOON

In conjunction with World Mental Health Month in October, Suria KLCC together with The Body Shop invites the public to be part of the change in temoving the stigma of mental health problems. Also coming onboard this year is the is Mental Illness Awareness & Support Association (MIASA).

The campaign with the tagline #YouMatter will run until 10 November 2022.

A SAFE SPACE FOR PEOPLE TO GATHER AND CONVERSE ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH

A safe space is available Suria KLCC for people to come together and converse about mental health without the fear of receiving judgment and being stigmatized by the rest of society.

This safe space, called Safe Space @ Suria KLCC, will be open for the duration of this campaign.

SAFE SPACE @ SURIA KLCC

  • Located at Level 1, Ampang Mall (you can’t miss it)
  • Will be opened throughout the campaign (until 10 November 2022)
  • 10 am to 10 pm daily
  • Participate in workshops, talks, and panel discussions with mental health professionals
  • Talk to the stationed mental health volunteer for more information

The calm room in Safe Space @ KLCC allows one to de-stim and find peace of mind.
WELCOMING THE CALM AFTER A TURBULENT MCO

“The last two years marked a turbulent and uncertain time for all,” says Andrew Brien, the Executive Director of Suria KLCC Sdn Bhd. “With the pandemic in the rear-view mirror, there’s no better time to reconnect and focus on recovery.”

He adds: “The Safe Space @ Suria KLCC is a welcoming space where the community can come together to share and learn. After all, a problem shared is a problem halved—we want people to leave the space feeling better and with more insight about themselves or others.”

A TIMELY EFFORT TO REACH OUT TO AND EMPOWER YOUTHS

YAM Tengku Puteri Raja Tengku Puteri Iman Afzan Al-Sultan Abdullah, the Founder and President of the Green Ribbon Group, emphasizes that Safe Space and similar efforts are needed to show our support for those with mental health problems as well as to highlight an ongoing commitment towards doing more for the cause.

She adds that for this year, the focus is on the mental health of youth. “The focus on youth mental health this year is especially timely for the Green Ribbon Group. We are very fortunate to be able to pilot programmes in secondary schools and universities that focus on mental health literacy, self-management and peer support. This has always been a dream of mine—to reach out to our youth and empower them to prioritise their mental health.”

Founder and President of MIASA, Anita Abu Bakar shares a similar sentiment. “Looking after each other should be everyone’s responsibility and not just the health sector alone,” she says. “This is why we should strive to prioritise community-based mental health support—so that the burden of care can be shifted from being shouldered solely by our incredible frontliners to being shouldered by all of us. Through efforts like this, it is our sincere hope that the scale of our response to the issues surrounding community mental health can begin to match the scale of the challenge itself.”


For more information on MIASA, you can visit www.miasa.org.my (link opens in a new tab), while more information on the Green Ribbon Group can be found by visiting greenribbongroup.com (link also opens in a new tab).

See the map below if you’re unsure as to where KLCC Suria is.

How Intraocular Lens Can Help People with Cataract and Presbyopia

WORDS LIM TECK CHOON

DR CHEONG FOOK MENG
Consultant Ophthalmologist
Gleneagles Hospital Kuala Lumpur
CONCERNING CATARACT

Dr Cheong Fook Meng shares that it is normal to develop cataracts as you age.

However, this condition can also be caused by eye injuries as well as certain diseases or medications.

As one’s cataract progresses, the lens in their eyes gradually become hard and cloudy, allowing less light to pass through. This leads to diminished vision and even complete blindness in severe cases.

ABOUT PRESBYOPIA 

“Presbyopia is another condition that occurs naturally as a person ages; your eyes gradually lose the ability to focus on nearby objects,” says Dr Cheong.

With presbyopia, the lens inside the eye progressively loses its flexibility, making it harder for the affected eye to focus the light reflected from objects.

A common sign that someone may have developed this condition is having to hold reading materials at arm’s length to make out what they are reading.

BOTH CAN BE TREATED WITH SURGERY & IMPLANTATION OF INTRAOCULAR LENS

“This surgical treatment allows the removal of the eye’s cloudy natural lens and replacing it with an intraocular lens,” explains Dr Cheong.

The intraocular lens is clear, made to fit one’s eye shape and personalised according to the patient’s condition and needs.

Intraocular lens (labelled as lens in the image). Click to view a larger version of this image.
TYPES OF INTRAOCULAR LENS AVAILABLE IN MALAYSIA
  • Monofocal lenses correct a single range of vision, usually to see distant objects. Additional issues will need to be fixed through other means.
  • Toric lenses are suitable for patients who also have astigmatism but, similar to monofocal lenses, they restore vision for only one area of focus.
  • Multifocal lenses are designed to provide clear vision for distant and near vision.
GOING FURTHER WITH EXTENDED DEPTH-OF-FOCUS INTRAOCULAR LENS  

Extended depth-of-focus intraocular lens delivers an enhanced range of vision with a reduced frequency of glares and halos, regardless of the lighting conditions.

During the day or when driving at night, these lenses deliver great vision and clarity.

For presbyopia

Extended depth-of-focus intraocular lens can be used to correct presbyopia, by creating a single elongated focal point to enhance one’s range of distance for which their eye can see an object clearly.

For cataract

While all lenses can fix cataracts, extended depth-of-focus intraocular lens may improve one’s quality of life.

They provide distant, intermediate (at arm’s length, such as for reading a newspaper or working on a laptop) and functional near vision (up close, such as for reading books and mobile phone screen), with minimum visual disturbances.

They may even decrease a patient’s need to wear glasses after their cataracts have been removed.

Important Things That You Should Know About Silent Heart Attacks

WORDS LIM TECK CHOON

DR PATRICK TIAU WEI JYUNG
Consultant Cardiologist
Sunway Medical Centre

Dr Patrick Tiau reveals that silent heart attacks, also known as silent myocardial infarction, account for 45% of heart attacks.

These heart attacks are “silent” because they occur without the usual, recognizable symptoms of a heart attack.

COMMON SYMPTOMS OF HEART ATTACK
  • Chest pain (often described as heavy or pressure sensation)
  • Radiating pain in the arm, neck, or jaw
  • Sudden shortness of breath
  • Sweating
  • Dizziness
HOWEVER, THESE SYMPTOMS ARE USUALLY NOT PRESENT WHEN ONE HAS A SILENT HEART ATTACK!
Because of this, many people may not know that they have experienced one until days or even weeks after.

However, Dr Patrick shares that there are some early warning signs to look out for.

SIGNS THAT YOU MAY HAVE HAD A SILENT HEART ATTACK

It’s good to consult a doctor when you have concerns, especially if you experience these signs and fall under the high-risk below (see below).

  • Feeling tired
  • Indigestion
  • Nausea
  • Sweating.

Dr Patrick says, “We have come across many patients who have dismissed the early warning symptoms as simply feeling tired, indigestion, nausea or sweating. By the time they seek out medical treatment for these symptoms, they are shocked to learn that what they are experiencing is actually due to a reduced blood flow to their heart, and that has caused them to have a silent heart attack.”

Silent heart attacks can lead to more serious health complications if left untreated over an extended period of time, such as an increased risk of another, potentially more deadly heart attack.

COMMON RISKS OF SILENT HEART ATTACKS
RISKS THAT CANNOT BE AVOIDED 
  • Age. The risk increases as we grow older.
  • Gender. Men are more at risk than women. However, women are more prone to a higher risk of complications after experiencing one, especially if they are diabetic.
  • Family history. The risk is higher for people with a family history of heart diseases.
RISKS THAT CAN BE MODIFIED 
  • Smoking. Chemicals in cigarettes stimulate one’s heartbeat and can dramatically increase one’s risk of heart attack.
  • High cholesterol. Individuals with elevated cholesterol levels can lead to formation of atherosclerotic plaque in the blood vessel and reduce blood flow to the heart.
  • High blood pressure: Having high blood pressure puts extra strain on the heart muscle. Over time, this causes the heart muscle to stiffen, thicken, and perform less optimally.
  • Individuals that are overweight or obese, especially when their weight tends to sit at the waist, are more at risk even if they do not have any other risk factors.
  • Physical inactivity. Doing regular exercise helps protect the heart by keeping under control other risk factors such as cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity.

“Undeniably our heart health is essential to allowing us to have a well-balanced and fulfilling life,” he says. “The heart itself is the first and last sign of life that is responsible for, quite literally, keeping us going. In combatting heart attacks, the most important thing to remember is that prevention is definitely better than cure.”

DR PATRICK’S TIPS TO REDUCE YOUR RISK OF SILENT HEART ATTACKS

Make the necessary small changes to daily lifestyle to reduce one’s risk factors. These changes include:

  • Regularly monitor blood pressure and cholesterol
  • Get sufficient exercise
  • Quit smoking
  • Eat a balanced diet of fruit, vegetables, lean meats and whole grains
  • Ensure that one’s blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar are well-controlled
  • Inform a doctor as soon as possible about any unusual symptoms that may indicate a silent heart attack

Once you go home from the hospital, it is essential that you keep taking your medications as prescribed. “This will ensure your heart health is kept in check, possibly for the rest of your life,” says Dr Patrick.

Consider joining a support group. Dr Patrick acknowledges that heart attack survivors may start to develop feelings of shock, sadness, and anxiety. This is normal, and these feelings can be managed with the right support.

“Some people find it helpful to join a support group where they can talk with others that have gone through a similar experience, or seek out companionship and encouragement through avenues such as the gym, or yoga classes,” he advises.